Tell me something good….TO READ

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I recently read Listen To Me Good: The Story of an Alabama Midwifea book on Black lay midwifery as told by a granny midwife in the earlier part of the 1900s. Things may look different in Black birth today as far as most Black women having their babies in a hospital, but back then Black women giving birth at home was the norm — well, that’s just the way it was. It was racism that created many segregated birthing spaces which, ironically, is what also prevailed, outlawing lay midwifery in Alabama, and paving the way to turn this traditional practice into an industry. This book was recommended to me by a Black midwife here in town, when I asked her for information on Black breastfeeding and history and she suggested I start there. I also recently read Soul On Fire and The Vegetarian Myth, — and that one will be reviewed on this blog over the next few weeks. Currently, I’m again reading The Black Woman’s Guide to BREASTFEEDINGsince Kathi Barber is assisting with the Summit here for next year and I thought it’d be nice to revisit her work.

I took a look at my wishlist on Amazon.com recently, to see what sounds good or what I’m in the mood for at the moment, because I love getting my hands on a good book. Here are a few titles from it, but there are many, many more. Most of the texts below are on breastfeeding — on culture, politics and theory, and I want the anthropology and archaeology texts more than anything. I checked out Is Breast Best along with Motherwit, from the library a few weeks ago but ended up being entirely too busy and didn’t get a chance to read them before they had to go back. Here are some titles that I want but haven’t been able to get just yet. Have you read any of these and if so, what are your thoughts? What are you currently reading and what do you recommend? What’s on your wishlist?

Look for my review of these texts in the near future.
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One thought on “Tell me something good….TO READ

  1. I have enjoyed reading some of your blog. I am a lactivist intactivist white girl. I figured I’d just get that out there right off the bat. :) I love anthropology and I love diversity. Anyhow, I have read several of the books listed; Dettwyler and Palmer’s and appreciate the list as I’m always looking for more good reads. I would like to suggest a book for you and would love to hear your perspective after you read it. Circumcision; A History of The World’s Most Controversial Surgery.
    http://www.amazon.com/Circumcision-History-Worlds-Controversial-Surgery/dp/0465043976 I would like to suggest that infant male circumcision is robbing both men and women of the fullest sexual experience that God/nature intended. It permanently alters sexual function as it destroys the natural gliding action of the foreskin and removes the most sensitive nerve endings of the penis. Also, because it externalizes the glans, the penis becomes less and less sensitive over time as the glans looses its natural mucous membrane and becomes keritinized. It is oppressive and corporations benefit off the sale of the live tissue that is harvested not to mention that the doctors and hospitals benefit from performing the surgery. It deserves mention that this surgery is performed on minors who cannot consent and is NOT recommended by any medical organization in the world. Black Americans have some of the highest rates of circumcision along with some of the lowest breastfeeding rates. Do these statistics go hand in hand? If so, why? Also, the US is currently on a campaign to circumcise Africa under the guise of preventing HIV. How do you feel about this? I have read the lack luster studies and quite frankly I am appalled by the blatant need to force this oppressive western custom on the Africans.

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